Katharina Coleman

Associate Professor

Office: Buch C405
Office Phone: 604-822-6032
Email: katharina.coleman@ubc.ca

Katharina Coleman (Ph.D. Princeton) specializes in International Relations, with a focus on international organisations, international security/peace operations, and international rules, norms, and legitimacy. Her regional area of expertise is sub-Saharan Africa. Her current book project examines the role of relatively small ("token") national troop contributions in contemporary military coalitions.

Teaching in 2012/2013

  • POLI 364A - International Organizations
  • POLI 464B - African Interstate Relations seminar
  • POLI 464F - African Interstate Relations field research course (Ethiopia, ARCAAP funded)
  • POLI 561A - International Relations Theory

Graduate Supervision

I am most interested in supervising research that focuses on issues of international legitimacy, the international use of military force, the UN or other formal international organisations, and/or African international relations.

Recent Publications

 

Katharina P. Coleman, “Innovations in ‘African Solutions to African Problems’: the evolving practice of regional peacekeeping in sub-Saharan Africa” Journal of Modern African Studies. Vol.49, No.4 (2011); 517-545

Katharina P. Coleman, “Locating Norm Diplomacy: Venue Change in International Norm Negotiations” European Journal of International Relations. Online version published in August 2011, forthcoming in print

Katharina P. Coleman, International Organisations and Peace Enforcement: the Politics of International Legitimacy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007.

Katharina P. Coleman and M. W. Doyle, "Introduction: Expanding Norms, Lagging Compliance," in E. Luck and M. W. Doyle (eds.), International Law and Organization: Closing the Compliance Gap. Boulder: Rowman and Littlefield, 2004.

 

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Tel:604.822.6079

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